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« Arthur C. Clarke's moral imperative of space exploration | Main | And now, not loving the alien: Asimov's, April/May 2008 »

March 26, 2008

Comments

Åka

I agree with most of your comments, but I found James Wallace Harris' ideas very interesting. I have been playing with thoughts about science fiction as meaning making literature (but not arrived at any good formulations of it yet), and in that it certainly has some common ground with religion.

Have you read Jupiter by Ben Bova? It had some almost interesting parts.

D. G. D. Davidson

I disagree with everyone's characterization of Fundamentalism, which does not teach that it has the complete truth about everything anymore than any other conservative religious stance does.

Gabriel Mckee

Have you seen any Ray Comfort videos? That man is certainly not listening to reason-- though he's an expert propagandist.

You're right, though-- He's not representative of all fundamentalists, just a particularly super-super-conservative subset of them, to whom many of the comments do, I think, apply.

James McGrath

I hope you won't miss IO9's recent short piece on how Cylons might convert humans to their religion: http://io9.com/374914/how-would-cylons-convert-us-to-their-religion

Since Ray Comfort was mentioned, I'll also share an old post of mine with video clips of the banana, peanut butter and pineapple arguments:

http://exploringourmatrix.blogspot.com/2007/08/banana-and-peanut-butter-arguments-on.html

Finally, any suggestions on where to publish very short stories of sci-fi exploring religious themes?

umbrarchist

{{{ The best theology, from Plato to Augustine to Alfred North Whitehead, depends on speculation, thought experiments, and best-guesses; the biggest crime of fundamentalism is its theological laziness. }}}

Of course the best theology comes from European culture.

Gabriel Mckee

"Theology" is a Western term, and applies best to Western thought. But Ibn al-'Arabi (for example) certainly fits the bill, too.

And to be briefly pedantic-- Augustine was from North Africa.

Gabriel Mckee

Oh, wait-- Ibn al-'Arabi is from Al-Andalus (aka Spain). Al-Ghazali, maybe?

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